Motherhood Meltdown: The Day After

Ever had a Motherhood Meltdown? You know, when all of the pent up everything finally comes flowing (exploding?) out and you scare your husband and children half to death with your dramatic outburst and huge alligator tears?

Yeah. That. When you find yourself needing a paper bag to breathe in and out of, curled up on the closet floor because the bed in your room just felt too exposed. Your husband comes in and tentatively rubs your shin while you gag and cough and sob into your pillow. He asks, “What do you need?” and you choke out, “I … don’t … KNOW!!!!”

Your four year old comes in and stops in his tracks and says, “Oh … Mama’s having a bad day?” and the two year old pops her blonde curls in to say, “Oh … Mama not happy now?”

You spend an hour on the phone with your mom or some other female confidant, and you are reassured that this is totally normal, every mom has done it, we just need to “get it out,” and tomorrow will be better.

You rub at the smeared mascara, blow your grossly congested nose, and shuffle sheepishly downstairs to see how everyone is faring.

And guess what–they’re fine. The kids are a little concerned, but once they see you walking upright, they assume you’re okay. And your husband pretends he understands (though he and I and we all know he never really will, since we barely understand it ourselves).

The Day After. 

Isn’t The Day After the best thing ever? Filled with renewed drive and determination to make small changes (baby steps people, baby steps), and feeling quite “light” with all those emotions spewed over the walls and floor of the closet the night before, you’re ready to rumble.

Setting schedules, finding verses, getting advice, chanting mantras like “I AM capable. I CAN do this. God HAS gifted me,” you go about your day.

And it’s a great day. As long as you don’t throw up your hands in defeat the first time something normal happens. You know, like spilled milk, fighting kids, a whining four year old, an unexpected bill, burned oatmeal, subzero weather. As long as you don’t feel defeated the first time something doesn’t go perfectly, as long as you can roll with it and maximize The Day After the Motherhood Meltdown, it’ll be a great day.

I had a great day. 🙂

And, I chatted with another mom of two with one on the way, also due in April, and she laughed and said, “Yep! I’ve spent a lot of time sobbing in the closet. Works every time! I feel so much better later.”

So, mothers, go have your Motherhood Meltdown. You might feel a bit sheepish, but you’ll get some great hugs from your kids, and seriously–The Day After is totally worth it.

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About kristinlindeen

I am Kristin. I am Erik's wife. I am Joshua, Rebecca, and Andrew's mom. I am known nationally as the "QBQ! Daughter" and keynote on Personal Accountability and the QBQ. I am certified in Myers Briggs and am passionate about helping people understand themselves and others better. I am John and Karen's daughter. I am sister to many, mentor to some, friend to others. Most defining, I am Christ's daughter, adopted by God--rescued and saved by grace. And almost every single day, I need to be reminded of that truth. Come say "hi" at www.QBQ.com and of course, browse the blog! I'd love to hear from you, so comment away!
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2 Responses to Motherhood Meltdown: The Day After

  1. Oh my goodness – can I tell you how refreshing it is to hear that other moms do this too and I’m not crazy? 🙂 And I’ve never thought of how refreshing The Day After is – but you’re absolutely right. It’s a brand-new beginning.

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